Solar Nova Scotia – Spring 2019 Courses

PASSIVE SOLAR HOME DESGIN COURSE

The Passive Solar Home Design Course is intended for the general public and, for those in design and construction. The instructor is a 40 year experienced solar designer-builder, Don Roscoe.

1 SOLAR BASICS for electricity, for active thermal hot water and hot air, and for passive solar ( 3 1/2Hrs )
2 CLIMATE CONTROL for comfort and health, energy and the environment (5 1/2Hrs)
3 SITE DESIGNING, working with nature, creating microclimates and integrating the shelter (3Hrs )
4 SHELTER DESIGNING, bringing you, your needs and your site together (4 1/2Hrs)
5 MAKING IT HAPPEN, costing, controlling costs, contracting and doing it yourself (1 1/2Hrs )
This is offered as a six-evening course in Halifax, Chester or Bridgewater; Spring, Winter & Fall.

With demand, locally organized weekend versions may be offered in other locations. Contact: solardon.ns@gmail.com

– SPRING –
— at Bridgewater High School (541-4367 Diana.Johnson@bridgewater.ca)
COURSES or (the location with the most attendees)
— at Chester, Forest Heights High (275-2712 jconrad@chester.ca).
Tuesdays 6:45-9:45PM April 16 > May 21.
— at Nova Scotia Institute of Technology, Leeds St., Halifax, Thursdays 7-10: April 18 > May 23
Information at SolarNS.ca
Registration at (852-4758 / solardon.ns@gmail.com)
The fee: $80 students, $90 single, $150 couples; with handouts. Optional textbooks($20/$40)

PASSIVE SOLAR CONSTRUCTION COURSE
The one-day PASSIVE SOLAR CONSTRUCTION COURSE is intended for those wishing to design and build a PASSIVE SOLAR HOME with an air recirculated heat storage slab. The instructor is a 44 year experienced solar designer-builder, Don Roscoe.
1 PASSIVE SOLAR BASICS
2 GROUND INSULATION instead of frost walls
3 HEAT STORAGE SLAB construction techniques and details
4 AIR RECIRCULATION and FILTRATION SYSTEM design and components
5 SYSTEM BALANCING and CONTROLS
Fee $60 & $50 students: with construction detail sheets & CD of the course visuals.
— at Nova Scotia Institute of Technology, Leeds St., Halifax, Saturday 9AM >-4:30PM April 27
Information at SolarNS.ca
Registration at (852-3789 / solardon.ns@gmail.com)

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Solar Nova Scotia offers practical courses on designing and building Solar Homes and Additions

The Passive Solar Home Design Course is intended for the general public and, for those in design and construction. The instructor is a 40 year experienced solar designer-builder, Don Roscoe.

1 SOLAR BASICS for electricity, for active thermal hot water and hot air, and for passive solar ( 3 1/2Hrs )
2 CLIMATE CONTROL for comfort and health, energy and the environment (5 1/2Hrs)
3 SITE DESIGNING, working with nature, creating microclimates and integrating the shelter (3Hrs )
4 SHELTER DESIGNING, bringing you, your needs and your site together (4 1/2Hrs)
5 MAKING IT HAPPEN, costing, controlling costs, contracting and doing it yourself (1 1/2Hrs )
This is offered as a six-evening course in Halifax, Chester or Bridgewater; Spring, Winter & Fall. With demand, locally organized weekend versions may be offered in other locations. Contact: solardon.ns@gmail.com
WINTER — at Bridgewater High School (541-4367 Diana.Johnson@bridgewater.ca)
COURSES or (the location with the most attendees)
— at Chester, Forest Heights High (275-2712 jconrad@chester.ca).

Tuesdays 6:45-9:45PM January 22 > February 26.
— at Nova Scotia Institute of Technology, Leeds St., Halifax, Thursdays 7pm-10pm: January 24 > February 28

Information at SolarNS.ca
Registration at (852-4758 / solardon.ns@gmail.com)
Fees: $80 students, $90 single, $150 couples; with handouts. Optional textbooks($20/$40)
On demand, a one-day PASSIVE SOLAR CONSTRUCTION COURSE will be offered mid-winter at Halifax & at other locally organized locations. This course is intended for those wishing to design and build a PASSIVE SOLAR HOME with an air recirculated heat storage slab.
1 PASSIVE SOLAR BASICS
2 GROUND INSULATION instead of frost walls
3 HEAT STORAGE SLAB construction techniques and details
4 AIR RECIRCULATION and FILTRATION SYSTEM design and components
5 SYSTEM BALANCING and CONTROLS
Fee $60 & $50 students: with construction detail sheets & CD of the course visuals.
Info. & Registration: solardon.ns@gmail.com

We Must Build Community and Food Security

As Karen Theriault stated, in a recent article, “Healthy Diet too Costly for Some: Expert,” in the Chronicle Herald publication, “We know that Nova Scotia has a particularly high rate of food insecurity with about one in six households experiencing this.” We know from farmers locally that growing food is getting more and more difficult. In fact, even mid-income households report that a lot of the vegetables and fruits are unaffordable now that drought and other factors of the climate change crisis that have driven up the prices for imported produce as well, all which spell more food insecurity in Nova Scotia.
People struggling without property or capacity to profit, even the working poor and the lower middle class, who are also MORE insecure than if they were working communally, building more resilient communities, have to face the runaway climate emergency without the cushion of “means,” [though, as the difficult-to-attribute (Alanis Obamsawin is one source) quote, “When the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.” points to], we need new, radical strategies to secure food for everyone.
 
Before the notion of private property and profit, was that of the “Common,” by which all indigenous and pockets of other cultures (including in Nova Scotia in my grandmother’s era) shared resources sustainably. An example of this in present-day has occurred, for the last five years, on the Halifax Peninsula, on land that belongs to the people–the Halifax Commons. This movement is called the Common Roots Urban Farm which catalyzed and enriched food production capacity for food banks and any citizens who paid the $40 fee for a growing plot at the now demolished Queen Elizabeth High School site. Now this vital development has been forced to move to make way for a new hospital (where many of the diseases being treated are largely as a result of poor nutrition and lifestyle choices (of which the sufferers of them have few) . The “irony loop” never ends.)
 
Apparently, no socially-minded citizen with fallow land has offered to lease to this vital health movement of urban farming. But, wait! Directly across the street from that site is another parcel of “Common” land, the site of the now demolished Saint Patrick’s High School. A citizens’ group has collected over seven thousand signatures for the municipal council imploring them to allow the Common Roots Urban Farm, a movement, the like which we will need more and more, as produce becomes too expensive to buy and too hard to grow.
 

We need strategies to apply the new Canada’s Food Guide with its 50% vegetables and fruits at every meal. How else can most segments of the population begin to attain this standard if we don’t sometimes shift our thinking away from prioritizing a monetary tax base of “condos for the rich” to the basic needs of the majority? This requires politicians to be far-thinking in the service of survival for the many, instead of short-sighted in the service of covering our common lands with private enterprises for the recreational and pecunious obsession for power and luxury of the few. This part of the common should be available to all citizens who need to grow and supply food to themselves and the neediest. Otherwise, the new Canada’s Food Guide will only be for the few who can afford its platform.

 

By Joanne Light

WANTED: HALIGONIAN YOUTH TO CUT SCHOOL WITH GRETA THUNBERG

Following the hottest summer on record in Sweden since records began 262 years ago , Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg started cutting classes at school. Dismayed by lack of real action on the climate crisis, Greta said, “If grown-ups don’t give a <__> about my future, I won’t either.”
On November 2, 2018, CCL Sudbury member Sophia Mathur conducted possibly the first the first Friday For Future Climate Strike in the Western Hemisphere in solidarity with Greta Thunberg in Sweden who has been striking from school since August. On Friday, December 7, youth in Victoria, Vancouver, Winnipeg, Sudbury, Kingston, Kitchener, Ottawa, and  Fredericton conducted Fridays For Future strikes.  Their actions made the CBC National on Friday, December 7, 2018, and Greta Thunberg tweeted her appreciation.In February youth in twelve Canadian cities from coast to coast have committed to striking. Check out this map.  https://cop24climatestrike.com/event-map/

As Greta Thunberg said in her speech at COP24 on behalf of Climate Justice, “We have run out of excuses and we are running out of time. We have come here to let you know that change is coming, whether you like it or not. The real power belongs to the people. Thank you.”Currently, most youth are committed to striking at least once a month in Canada.

Their goal for Friday, May 3, is to have thousands of youth in Canada striking from coast to coast to coast.

Some Canadian Fridays For Future strikers have decided to sister strike with the Global Friday’s For Future strike on March 15. Definitely youth in Winnipeg, Toronto and Waterloo are sister-striking on March 15.

On February 2, 2019 CBC’s Day 6 News Program Canadian: https://www.cbc.ca/radio/day6/cutting-class-to-stop-climate-change-young-canadians-strike-for-the-planet-1.5001974

If you want to join the Fridays For Future strikes nationally, please register here: https://cop24climatestrike.com/register-event/
Sophia Mathur, 11 years old

 

Sudbury, ON

Striking one Friday a month since November 3.

Environmental Assessment: Northern Pulp

On February 7, 2019, Northern Pulp Nova Scotia Corporation (Northern Pulp) registered the Replacement Effluent Treatment Facility Project for environmental assessment, in accordance with Part IV of the Environment Act.

The purpose of the Project is to replace the existing effluent treatment facility (ETF) with a new one to treat wastewater received from the Northern Pulp pulp mill at Abercrombie Point, Pictou County. The Project includes a new ETF and a new effluent pipeline that will carry treated effluent to be discharged in the Northumberland Strait.

Northern Pulp intends to use an AnoxKaldnes BAS™ biological activated sludge treatment process purchased from Veolia Water Technologies, which combines moving bed biofilm reactor technology with conventional activated sludge. Once treated, effluent would be sent via an approximately 15.5 kilometers-long pipeline. The effluent pipeline would follow the Highway 106 for approximately 11.4 kilometers, then enter the marine environment near the Northumberland Ferries marine terminal, and continue for approximately 4.1 kilometers through Caribou Harbour to the Northumberland Strait where the treated effluent would be discharged via an engineered diffuser.

On February 7, 2019, all project information including the Registration Document will be available on Nova Scotia Environment website athttp://www.novascotia.ca/nse/ea/.

Please note that written comments must be provided no later than March 9, 2019 to be considered in this environmental assessment. Written comments are requested to be provided via e-mail if possible.

On or before March 29, 2019, the Minister of Environment will decide if the project can be granted conditional environmental assessment approval.

All comments received will be posted on the department’s website for public viewing (after the Minister of Environment has made a decision on this environmental assessment). In the case of an individual, the address, email and contact information will be removed before being placed on the website. By submitting your comments, you are consenting to the posting of your comments on the department’s website.

 

If you have any questions contact:

Helen Yeh

Environmental Assessment Officer

Nova Scotia Environment

1903 Barrington Street, Suite 2085

Halifax, Nova Scotia, B3J 2P8

e-mail: ea@novascotia.ca

Toll-free phone number: (833) 363-4874

 

Let’s Talk Tidal Power: What’s Happening in the Bay of Fundy?

NSEN Tidal Event Photo.pngAs the world moves to replace fossil fuels with clean renewable energy, Nova Scotia finds itself with some of the world’s greatest tidal power resources in the iconic Bay of Fundy. After decades of research and pilot projects, however, some people are growing concerned that the present course of development will have negative consequences for the natural systems of the Bay and the livelihoods and cultures that are tied to it. So, what’s happening in the Bay of Fundy?

The Nova Scotia Environmental Network and the Halifax Central Library are proud to present this panel discussion to help the public understand who is who in the tidal energy sector, the history of development, where things stand today, what is at stake, and how the future could unfold. 

Moderated by Dr. Boris Worm of Dalhousie University, the panel will include tidal researchers, developers, regulators, First Nations, and fishers, bringing together a diverse set of perspectives for a balanced discussion and Q&A period.


Funding for this program is provided by the Atlantic Council for International Cooperation and Global Affairs Canada.

Click attending and share our Facebook event here!