Nature Trust’s Big Win for the Birds: Seal Island Protected

Aug. 16, 2019 (Clark’s Harbour, NS)—A   conservation achievement by the Nova Scotia Nature Trust brings good news for birds and bird lovers. Tonight they announced the protection of 650 acres on Seal Island, off the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia. One of the region’s most important sites for migratory birds, the remote island is renowned for its vast numbers of birds, variety of species and rarities. Its protection is welcome news amidst plummeting migratory bird populations across the planet.

The news was celebrated at a community event in Clark’s Harbour on Cape Sable Island—a traditional jumping-off point for reaching remote Seal Island.

The 650 acre Seal Island Conservation Lands, encompassing nearly 80 per cent of the island, had been threatened by private development, which would have devastated the natural habitats and the birds they support, and ended traditional use of much of the island. Thanks to the Nature Trust, birds will thrive, and people can continue enjoy what has been called the ‘wondrous foggy isle’ as they always have.

The Nature Trust’s Executive Director, Bonnie Sutherland noted, “Protecting Seal Island, one of the most important islands for migratory birds in Atlantic Canada, is a major win for bird conservation and recovery.”

One of Nova Scotia’s largest and most remote islands, located 32 km off the coast, Seal Island features a diversity of habitats, from stunted, mossy forest, salt marsh, bog and barachois pond, to rocky shore, sandy beach and grass dunes. This diversity, its isolation from the mainland and major human impacts, and location in the flight path of countless migratory birds all contribute to its significance for birds and bird conservation.

Over 330 species have been recorded on Seal Island, using it for breeding, overwintering, migration or storm shelter. Recorded species include over 20 nationally and provincially-designated bird species at risk such as Roseate Tern, Harlequin Duck, Canada Warbler, Rusty Blackbird, Red Knot, and Barn Swallow. Other birds of conservation concern have been sighted on the island, including Common Eider, Leach’s Storm-petrel, and Atlantic Puffin.

Located strategically on a major migration path called the Atlantic Flyway, the island acts like a migrant trap, drawing in birds from across a vast swath of ocean, and providing a critical refuge for birds to refuel and replenish on their long migratory journeys.

Astounding numbers of birds have been recorded, including single day reports of 5000 American Robins, 1100 White-throated Sparrows, 1000 Palm Warblers and 500 raptors. Seal Island also provides refuge for rarely seen visitors to Nova Scotia, exotic birds blown far off course during storms.

Protecting this unparalleled migratory hotspot and large, ecologically rich island is not only significant for bird conservation. It is also significant in addressing biodiversity loss, and conservation of over 20 species at risk in Canada and many other species of increasing concern for conservation.

Eric Mills, a passionate birder who has been visiting Seal Island with his bird-loving family and friends almost every year since 1967, was delighted with the news.

“The Nature Trust’s protection of Seal Island is an important step forward for migratory bird populations” Mills said. He noted that migratory birds face the continuing loss of food and shelter across many parts of eastern North America. “Ensuring these necessities, especially at Seal Island—the critical beginning or ending point of their long migrations—is a highly significant,” he added.

Protecting the island from private development also preserves its rich history and culture. Although year-round habitation ended in the 1990s, it is still used seasonally by fishermen, birders, and many local families who have been connected to the island for generations.

Seal Island was acquired with the financial support of the Government of Canada through the federal department of Environment and Climate Change, the Nova Scotia Crown Share Land Legacy Trust, and many generous families and individuals.

The island adds to a growing network of protected islands in the area including the Nature Trust’s nearby Outer Bald Group and Bon Portage Island Conservation Lands, conserved in partnership with the Nova Scotia Bird Society and Acadia University, respectively.

But according to the Nature Trust, with 96% of coastal islands in the area privately-owned and very few (about 6%) formally protected, more island conservation is critical in protecting coastal biodiversity and recovering and sustaining bird populations. The Nature Trust is already working to secure its next island win for birds. They have also begun collaborative planning for long-term restoration, monitoring, and management of Seal and surrounding islands, in partnership with community members and other research and conservation partners.

Sutherland noted, “People keen to make a difference for birds can join in the conservation action. Charitable donations are critical to help protect more coastal islands and to ensure their long-term stewardship.”

To donate, volunteer, or find out more, visit nsnt.ca or telephone the Nature Trust at 1 (877) 434-LAND.

Advertisements

April 5th Deadline: Enable N.S. Nature Trust (NSNT)  to save 3000 wild acres through the federal gov’t funding

(Dartmouth, NS) – The Nova Scotia Nature Trust’s Lasting Landscapes campaign was already on track for historic land conservation achievements.  Now, an unexpected $400,000 top-up in matching funds means even greater biodiversity wins can be leveraged for Nova Scotia. The Nature Trust has just added 2 more potential conservation sites to the 15 already being protected across the province.  To seize this new opportunity, the Nature Trust needs to raise another $100,000, and secure both new conservation sites, by April 5, 2019.

The Nature Trust began its historic “Lasting Landscapes” conservation campaign just months ago, providing nature-loving Nova Scotians with a rare opportunity:  for every dollar donated, four additional dollars are generated through the Government of Canada’s Nature Fund and the Nova Scotia Crown Share Land Legacy Trust.

To date, the Nature Trust has raised its minimum goal of $750,000, which has leveraged matching funds of over $3 million for land conservation. With these funds the Nature Trust is working to secure 15 outstanding conservation sites across the province, encompassing over 3,000 acres of Nova Scotia’s best wild areas. It took the Nature Trust its first 13 years to save 3,000 acres of private land. Though this inspiring campaign, the Nature Trust aims to repeat that feat in a matter of months.

The new protected areas include spectacular forest and freshwater wilderness in the Mabou Highlands and Cobequid Hills, and the renowned Seal Island, a critical refuge for migratory birds. New lands will also be added to the Barren Meadow Turtle Sanctuary, the 100 Wild Islands, and the majestic St. Mary’s River conservation lands.

The charity credits the campaign’s success to an unprecedented outpouring of support from donors and landowners across the province who took full advantage of a 4 to 1 matching of donations.

Recognizing the Nature Trust’s inspiring track record, the Government of Canada offered a last-minute increase to their funding incentive. Up to $400,000 can be leveraged to save land, if the Nature Trust can deliver two additional conservation sites and raise at least $100,000 by April 5.

Bolstered by the outpouring of support to date, the Nature Trust has seized this opportunity and signed offers to acquire the two additional properties:  one in the Mabou Highlands and another in a popular near-urban wildland just minutes outside of Halifax.

The deadline to close on both land deals, and to raise $100,000 in donations, is April 5.

“Seeing so many people support this campaign, including many who’ve never supported us before—it’s clear that saving nature matters to Nova Scotians,” says Bonnie Sutherland, Executive Director of the Nature Trust. “And yes, it’s a tight timeline, but we simply can’t say no to this historic 4 to 1 conservation funding opportunity and from the generosity we’ve seen so far, Nova Scotians agree.”

One of the new sites targeted for protection encompasses 100 acres of forest lands near Inverness, Cape Breton. The property fills a critical gap between the vast coastal lands already protected by the Nature Trust and Crown lands slated for designation as a Wilderness Area.

The other new site is a 100 acre property, just outside of Halifax, with extensive shoreline on Frederick Lake. The land is surrounded by the Five Bridge Lakes Wilderness Area, a vast, wild landscape of rugged, rocky barrens, unique forests and lakes, home to endangered mainland moose and rare plants, birds and lichens.

The risk of development of this ‘inholding’ of private land has long been a concern to the many environmental groups who helped to establish the Wilderness Area, and the countless volunteers and organizations who help to steward the area and the spectacular Bluff Wilderness trail.

“We are just thrilled that the Frederick Lake property will be saved,” says Richmond Campbell, a long-time volunteer with the Woodens River Watershed Environmental Organization and Nature Trust supporter. “Development of that shoreline would seriously impact connectivity of habitat within the Wilderness Area. Housing all along that shore would also devastate the incredible vistas and wilderness values for the many people who like the Bluff Trail and paddle these wilderness lakes.”

 “With the Bluff Wilderness Trail and the Mabou Highlands so cherished by so many people, we’re confident the community will step up to help us save these special places,” says Sutherland. “With every dollar donated leveraging another four dollars, there’s never been a better chance for Nova Scotians to make a difference for nature.”

All donations will be matched 4 to 1, but only until the April 5 deadline.

Charitable donations can be made online at www.nsnt.ca or by phone at (902) 425-LAND. For more information visit nsnt.ca/lastinglandscapes.

Nature Trust adds missing puzzle piece to a Cape Breton wilderness area

Baddeck River Lands Adds to Nature Trust’s Historic Land Campaign

[Baddeck, NS]—A 130-acre gift of Cape Breton land to the Nova Scotia Nature Trust protects old growth forests, habitat for endangered wildlife, and ensures the future of a major provincial Wilderness Area. The achievement is part of an extraordinary Nature Trust land conservation campaign. Through matching fund commitments, every dollar raised by March 31 brings four more dollars to save land, up to 3,000 acres, across the province.

The Baddeck River land protects ecologically rich and important old-growth hardwood forests, pristine river shoreline and habitat for endangered wildlife such as Canada Lynx and Pine Marten. The conservation benefits extend beyond the property as well – as an inholding of private land within the 6,800 acre Baddeck River Wilderness Area, the property is like a missing piece in a puzzle. Without protection, the property could have been developed opening the wilderness to roads, invasive species, clearcutting, and other threats.

Its protection eliminates these threats and ensures an intact corridor for wildlife between the highlands and the river valley. This vast, unbroken wilderness with old growth forests is essential for wildlife like lynx, bears, owls and woodpeckers.

Irene and the late Ernest Forbes, the land donors, are delighted their treasured lands will be protected, forever. Many Nova Scotian families have strong, multi-generational connections to their land, and worry about what will happen to their special place after they’re gone. Will it be sold, subdivided or cleared?  Will the beautiful woods or pristine lakeshores be destroyed, and opportunities to enjoy these wild places lost?

The late Ernest Forbes did not want that to happen to his treasured lands on the Baddeck River. The lovely old hardwood forests and the wild river had been perfect for Ernest, a hunter and angler.

“Ernest loved that piece of land,” said Irene of her husband, who passed away in 2015. “It was good for his soul. It made him happy. He wanted other people to enjoy it as much as he did. That’s why we have donated the land to the Nature Trust. They can ensure the property remains in its natural state, forever.”

This conservation achievement is part of national efforts to address the growing crisis of biodiversity loss across Canada and beyond. The government of Canada has recently committed to protecting 17% of Canada by 2020 and made a historic $1.3 billion investment to ensure that goal is reached.

To build momentum for this national effort, the Government chose key conservation leaders across the country, including the Nature Trust, to deliver quick wins for biodiversity—significant, immediate land conservation gains. The Nature Trust launched an ambitious, landmark conservation drive, the Lasting Landscapes Campaign that aims to protect as many as 15 new conservation sites encompassing over 3,000 acres of Nova Scotia’s natural areas, in just a few months. The campaign will protect as much land as the organization conserved in its first 13 years of conservation.

The Honorable Mark Eyking, Member of Parliament for the Sydney-Victoria riding where the lands are located, welcomed the news of the new protected lands. “Being from a rural community, I recognize the importance of maintaining our forests and wildlife. I commend the Forbes family for setting aside the 130-acre inholding to be protected, and I commend the Nova Scotia Nature Trust as the caretakers of this property and others across the province,” noted Mr Eyking.

By supporting the Nature Trust’s Campaign, other citizens can be a part of protecting Canada’s biodiversity too. Through matching funds from the Nature Fund and the Nova Scotia Crown Share Land Legacy Trust, every dollar donated by March 31, 2019, leverages another four dollars to save the land.

To meet matching fund requirements, and leverage over three million dollars for conservation, the Nature Trust must not only secure a record number of conservation sites by March 31 but must also raise another $750,000 in public support.  To date, Nova Scotians have stepped up with $600,000.

Bonnie Sutherland, Executive Director of the Nova Scotia Nature Trust noted, “It’s an incredible, unprecedented opportunity for individual Nova Scotians to make a big difference for nature. With this 4 to 1 match, a $100 donation means $500 to save the land.  A $1000 donation means $5000 to protect the places we love!”

Charitable donations can be made at nsnt.ca or by phone at (902) 425-LAND. Every dollar donated by March 31, 2019, will leverage four additional dollars in biodiversity conservation.

The Baddeck River Conservation Lands add to a growing network of over 100 lands protected by the Nova Scotia Nature Trust across the province, encompassing over 11,000 acres of priority habitats and rich biodiversity.

Ministry of Energy and Mines Backtracks on No Plan to Cap Contaminating Drill Hole

John Perkins spokesperson for Sustainable Northern Nova Scotia says “SuNNS membership and Tatamagouche area residents are pleased to hear the Ministry of Energy and Mines is committed to capping a leaking exploration drill hole in the French River Watershed”.

Perkins notes “this is a big change in the Ministry of Energy and Mines
approach to this contaminating drill hole.” Frances Willick reported in a January 25 CBC article that Don James, Ministry of Energy and Mines, had stated “the responsibility for the hole now rests with the landowner”. “Mines and Energy’s reversal indicates the power of a Free Press, the effectiveness of local community advocacy groups like SuNNS and the power of municipal governments to bring pressure on the provincial government” says Perkins.
“The contaminating drill hole sits in the French River watershed, the sole source of water for the Village of Tatamagouche, so I think the Municipality of Colchester and area Councilor Michael Gregory were very upset when Mines and Energy failed to contact them regarding their plans to not address the polluting drill hole” says SuNNS member Paul Jenkinson.
“The discovery of one uncapped contaminating drill hole on Warwick Mountain and the possibility of more leaking drill holes has raised the spectre of 780 other unmonitored mining exploration drill holes across the province”, Perkins notes.
SuNNS is asking the Ministry of Energy and Mines to immediately instruct staff to visit all drill hole sites and return in 6 months with a report on their condition.
SuNNS is asking Minister Mombourquette to issue an order that any polluting drill holes be immediately capped by the Ministry of Energy and Mines, upon discovery of their “leaking” status.
SuNNS is asking Minister Mombourquette to remove new regulatory language that allows landowners to request wells remain uncapped.
SuNNS once again calls on the Ministry of Energy and Mines to abandon plans to issue a Request for Proposals for gold mining exploration or development in the French River Watershed and the six other watersheds in the current Enclosure Area.
SuNNS further supports the efforts of the Municipality of Colchester as it seeks “Protected“ status for the French River Watershed under the Environmental Act given that the French River is the sole source of water for the Village of Tatamagouche.

Environment Network (EN) Report to Diocesan Council Dec. 2018

National recognition: I am pleased to say that our diocese EN was featured in a national church article during Seasons of Creation:  https://www.anglican.ca/news/diocesan-environment-network-builds-alliances-in-nova-scotia-and-p-e-i/30022769/

Membership is approximately 200 and growing. Many churches have multiple members. The Church of St Andrew in Cole Harbour probably has the most, approximately a dozen parishioners are members of the EN. Members are involved in varying degrees.

Communication: At our September meeting we reviewed the EN’s call to teach, inform and motivate parishes to be greener, support all people who care about God’s creation, encouraging environmental activism, energy conservation and waste reduction. We agreed to take advantage of the Diocesan Times, to submit articles about people and parishes, profile them, what they are doing and how they are accomplishing it. Good news stories, for example the St Margaret’s community garden. Provide information on where to go to obtain information and funding. We should also continue to promote the EN in parishes and throughout the diocese. Engaging parishes in greening our buildings. A subcommittee developed a resource list for our webpage with the DT. One of our members, a journalist, will write articles featuring parishes that are engaged in caring for creation and a quarterly article on a “big issue”.

EN Retreat Weekend and Day Retreats: Evaluations showed satisfaction with the retreat in May and there were requests for more retreats. Some asked for annual retreats and one person asked for “mini day retreats”. As a result, the EN partnered with Kairos Canada and Christ Church, Darmouth and held an initial day retreat Nov. 18 with 30 participants. More day retreats are being planned for 2019 in Charlottetown, Pictou, Cape Breton, possibly Amherst and Yarmouth. Day retreats spreads those events throughout the diocese, engages more people and reduces costs. We would also be happy to provide day retreats for parishes, regions and various groups within the diocese as well. The EN is requesting Diocesan Council support. Estimated costs of day retreats is $500 each.

Season of Creation: We will approach Archbishop Ron about in promoting Season of Creation next year to increase participation. That being said, from my latest Creation Matters meeting, it appears that our diocese has more parishes engaged in Season of Creation than any other diocese in the country. At least a dozen parishes engaged in Season of Creation. I was guest preacher at the Church of St Andrew in Cole Harbour the end of September. Kudos to all who celebrated Seasons of Creation particularly:

Parish of Horton, Wolfville:

Held a mid-week book study using “Grounded: Finding God in the World.

Adapted a creation focused Eucharist from South Africa. “The response from a diverse group of folks was thought-provoking and theologically deep.”

Undertook a day retreat called “Soil and Spirituality” According to the rector, “Quiet contemplation on dirt, spirit, connecting with our roots in a beautiful garden setting at the Quiet Garden in Wolfville. Rev’d Lynn Uzans of the Anglican Parish of Wilmot lead this restorative day retreat.”

St. John the Evangelist, Middle Sackville:

Who marked the Season of Creation on four Sundays through September.
One of their Lay Readers, Maxine Simpkin found an “Earth” beach ball that was suspended from the cross beam in the middle of the congregation. They used the Joe Miller piece, “If the Earth were only a few feet…” as part of the liturgy opening. Maxine also found some “Earth” squeezy balls that they gave out to the children and the rest of those present the next week which was Welcome Back Sunday had a caring for creation theme.
One week they located the new baptismal promise to sustain and restore the Earth at the opening of the service as a reminder of our commitment.
They used the “Earth Blue Marble” photo from space on their bulletin covers (instead of the church photo) and on their slides for the projector.

“This was St. John’s first year so we started small and hope to do better next year.”

Developing relationships with like-minded organizations inside and outside the church: The church is in the unique position of being able to provide spiritual care and support to environmentalists. To better connect with other environmental groups and individuals Tory Byrne represents our network on the board of the Nova Scotia Environmental Network and serves as treasurer, https://nsenvironmentalnetwork.com/

Our EN promoted and supported Nova Scotia Environmental Network, Ecology Action Centre, Healthy Forest Coalition, Northern Pulp, Alton Gas and Council of Canadians Blue Community campaign.

Our expression of support to the fishers who are protesting pollution by Northern Pulp on Facebook resulted in well over 60 likes and positive comments from members of the Clean Up the Pictou County Pulp Mill FB page.

Provided support to Joanne Light for travel to Citizens’ Climate Lobby Canada ‘s 13th National Conference and Lobbying Days, “Building Bridges,” on Parliament Hill (https://canada.citizensclimatelobby.org/).  

I am still an active member of national church’s Creation Matters Task Group and represent the ACC on the Kairos Eco justice Circle. And I recently acted as a resource to United Church Maritime Conference on their new environmental program Faithful Footprints.

Lenten Practice in our diocese: It was agreed at our September meeting that the EN would develop a “Stations of the Cross” type spiritual practice for Lent using local photographs taken by Donna Giles from the Church of St Andrew in Cole Harbour. The Stations will be available to parishes and regions throughout the diocese. Parishes or regions will be able to book the Stations in advance. EN members could be available for support. Contact Rev Marian if your parish would like to book the Stations. marian.lucas.jefferies@gmail.com 902-483-6866

On Line Book Club: After a member of the EN lent me a book called Chasing Francis, I am hoping to introduce an on line book club.

Tory Byrne’s letter to the Nova Scotia Environmental Network re the meeting with the Minister of the Environment:

Specifically, the three areas I would like to see addressed are

1. The need for environmental non-profits to have core funding support from government, especially at a network level. It’s hard enough to find financial support for specific projects; it’s nearly impossible for administration, coordination, communication and education. Governments, both federal and provincial have noted the need for the public community groups to do monitoring and education because governments aren’t doing it. – And because self-monitoring by industry fails in the face of the need for industry and shareholder profits.

2. The environment can heal us, physically, mentally and spiritually, and keep us healthy. But if we continue to destroy the environment, it will kill us. This is a link which governments are missing. This government is taking a beating on health care, yet ignores practices and papers from other parts of the world that show that healthcare costs can be significantly reduced and health significantly improved by maintaining and building healthy forests, waterways and air, while providing access to all people. This is an environment issue, a health issue, a social justice issue and a spiritual wellbeing issue.

3. Listen to environmentalists: indigenous, academic, and the ecologically involved. Value all the knowledge that is out there. We don’t expect legislators to be environmental experts. We do expect them to listen and consider, act on and continue to be visibly acting on advice and information from all sources. Don’t pit industry against environmentalists (we do that well enough) but work with the issues to protect the environment AND provide for jobs. And probably profits – though these tend to leave the province anyhow). Example: according to the Economist, it costs $14,000 to extract one kilo of gold from the ground, as is currently being proposed for the Goldboro area gold mine, a mine which will devastate the land and waters and wildlife for generations. It costs only $4,000 to extract that same one kilo of gold from recycling electronics, which does minimal damage or even benefits to the environment. Both methods provide jobs. Due diligence may provide ways to better outcomes for the environment and for the people.

Tory

Respectfully submitted,

The Rev. Marian Lucas-Jefferies

Coordinator, Environment Network

The East Coast’s First Package Free Shop

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

According to the CRC’s website, Canadians produce 31 million tonnes of waste each year. Only about 30% of those 31 million tonnes is recycled, and the rest is added to landfills, or worse, ends up polluting the natural environment.

Kate Pepler has been making an impactful change with the recent opening of a package-free cafe, bulk store, and community hub, The Tare Shop, in the north end of Halifax. When asked where the idea for the shop came from, Pepler explained, “After graduating, I was pretty depressed about the state of the world, so I started Our Positive Planet as a way to seek out and share environmental success stories to inspire action. That’s how I fell into the zero waste movement and started looking at my own plastic consumption… I realized how hard it was in Halifax to shop package free. There wasn’t one place that offered it all, so that’s where the idea came from.”

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

The shop carries a variety of products in bulk that you can fill your own containers with, as well as sustainable lifestyle items. “The easier it is for people to access these products package free, the more people will live this way,” says Pepler.

Processed with VSCO with a6 presetIn the shop’s cafe, there are no disposable cups or plastic food wraps. You have the option of bringing your own travel mug to take out, or sitting in to use one of theirs. If you don’t have a travel mug, there are some available for purchase, or you can borrow one from the store’s mug library.

Not only does The Tare Shop greatly help people live a life with less waste, but it also encourages taking a few minutes out of your busy day to sit down and enjoy a coffee, which is something we all could get value from. The cafe carries Java Blend coffee, World Tea House, and fresh goodies from local bakeries (often with gluten-free and vegan options!).

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

Clearly, waste is a huge problem that the whole world faces. When considering this pressing issue, Pepler suggested, “I think that the biggest issue is how disconnected we’ve become from everything. From where we get our food, to the products that we use, how things are made, the impacts that our actions have. I think that’s where the biggest issue lies. We consume without thinking about our actions… When we throw something ‘away,’ it isn’t going away. There is no magical land that is ‘away’. It goes somewhere, whether it’s a landfill or an ocean, it goes somewhere.”

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

If you’re interested in seeing more from The Tare Shop and learning about upcoming events, you can check out thetareshop.com, find them on Facebook, or follow them on Instagram: @thetareshop.

 

Words & Photos by Jenna Clayton

Update & Request from the Canadian Environmental Network

Note from the Chair:

Somehow it’s always surprising how much activity takes place in the fall. September hits, and suddenly it’s time to dive into new projects and catch up on existing ones.

These have been an exciting couple of months around here. Mike Simpson, an RCEN alumnus and Executive Director of the British Colombia Council for International Co-operation (BCCIC), joined the board in October. Mike has been doing excellent work in relation to the Sustainable Development Goals, and his experience with RCEN’s International Caucus will be incredibly valuable as we reclaim our role as a voice for Canadian ENGOs at home and abroad. He will be replacing Deborah Glaser, also of BCCIC, who joined the RCEN board for a brief period before making the decision to return to the United States with her family. So thank you Deborah, and welcome Mike!

In other news, a group of Ottawa-based RCEN-ers met this month for an in-depth conversation (sure to be the first of many) about where RCEN stands and where we want to go. Although technology expands our ability to communicate across large distances, there’s nothing like a face-to-face meeting to really get things done. We had some frank discussions about our hopes for the Network and the realities that we currently face, and we started to craft a vision of the RCEN we want to create.

One important point that emerged during this meeting was that the federal government has commitments that it will be trying to meet by summer 2019 (see the “Resources” section below for a link to summaries of relevant federal mandates). RCEN and its members have an opportunity to show that we have the expertise to support Canada in achieving those goals.

Although a small, localized approach has practical advantages for the early stages of this process, I want to make sure that your voices are heard at. In particular, I want to hear from you about:

1) how a national network of ENGOs and activists could best serve your organization and fill the existing gaps in Canada’s environmental community;

2) how your work could help advance the government’s environmental goals and mandates; and

3) your “wish list” of the collaboration and support that you’d like to find within the ENGO community.

And as always, if you want to strut your stuff or reach out to your fellow members, please get in touch. We would love to showcase your projects or accomplishments in our newsletter or on social media. This is your network – please use it!

 

Contact: Alex Keenan | RCEN  chair@rcen.ca