Ministry of Energy and Mines Backtracks on No Plan to Cap Contaminating Drill Hole

John Perkins spokesperson for Sustainable Northern Nova Scotia says “SuNNS membership and Tatamagouche area residents are pleased to hear the Ministry of Energy and Mines is committed to capping a leaking exploration drill hole in the French River Watershed”.

Perkins notes “this is a big change in the Ministry of Energy and Mines
approach to this contaminating drill hole.” Frances Willick reported in a January 25 CBC article that Don James, Ministry of Energy and Mines, had stated “the responsibility for the hole now rests with the landowner”. “Mines and Energy’s reversal indicates the power of a Free Press, the effectiveness of local community advocacy groups like SuNNS and the power of municipal governments to bring pressure on the provincial government” says Perkins.
“The contaminating drill hole sits in the French River watershed, the sole source of water for the Village of Tatamagouche, so I think the Municipality of Colchester and area Councilor Michael Gregory were very upset when Mines and Energy failed to contact them regarding their plans to not address the polluting drill hole” says SuNNS member Paul Jenkinson.
“The discovery of one uncapped contaminating drill hole on Warwick Mountain and the possibility of more leaking drill holes has raised the spectre of 780 other unmonitored mining exploration drill holes across the province”, Perkins notes.
SuNNS is asking the Ministry of Energy and Mines to immediately instruct staff to visit all drill hole sites and return in 6 months with a report on their condition.
SuNNS is asking Minister Mombourquette to issue an order that any polluting drill holes be immediately capped by the Ministry of Energy and Mines, upon discovery of their “leaking” status.
SuNNS is asking Minister Mombourquette to remove new regulatory language that allows landowners to request wells remain uncapped.
SuNNS once again calls on the Ministry of Energy and Mines to abandon plans to issue a Request for Proposals for gold mining exploration or development in the French River Watershed and the six other watersheds in the current Enclosure Area.
SuNNS further supports the efforts of the Municipality of Colchester as it seeks “Protected“ status for the French River Watershed under the Environmental Act given that the French River is the sole source of water for the Village of Tatamagouche.

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Let’s Talk Tidal Power: What’s Happening in the Bay of Fundy?

NSEN Tidal Event Photo.pngAs the world moves to replace fossil fuels with clean renewable energy, Nova Scotia finds itself with some of the world’s greatest tidal power resources in the iconic Bay of Fundy. After decades of research and pilot projects, however, some people are growing concerned that the present course of development will have negative consequences for the natural systems of the Bay and the livelihoods and cultures that are tied to it. So, what’s happening in the Bay of Fundy?

The Nova Scotia Environmental Network and the Halifax Central Library are proud to present this panel discussion to help the public understand who is who in the tidal energy sector, the history of development, where things stand today, what is at stake, and how the future could unfold. 

Moderated by Dr. Boris Worm of Dalhousie University, the panel will include tidal researchers, developers, regulators, First Nations, and fishers, bringing together a diverse set of perspectives for a balanced discussion and Q&A period.


Funding for this program is provided by the Atlantic Council for International Cooperation and Global Affairs Canada.

Click attending and share our Facebook event here!

Opportunity to input: Government and expert review of  Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Secretariat for Canada wishes to inform you that the Second Order Draft of the IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate is available for government and expert review until January 11, 2019, 19:00 EST.

The SROCC is highly relevant for Canada with its focus on high mountain areas; polar regions; sea level rise and implications for low-lying islands; coasts and communities; changing ocean, marine ecosystems and dependent communities; and extremes, abrupt changes and managing risks.

Review of the SROCC Second Order Draft by experts in Canada will help ensure that it provides a balanced and comprehensive assessment of the latest scientific findings and relevant, factual and scientific information for policy makers.

An online registration process is open for prospective expert reviewers via the SOD Review webpage. Registration will close on 4 January 2019, 19:00 ESTone week before the end of the review period.

The IPCC Secretariat for Canada values the contributions of Canada’s expert reviewers in this process and we thank-you in advance for your time and efforts. Opportunity to input: Government and expert review of

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Marine Sanctuary Webinar Series

The National Marine Sanctuary Webinar Series provides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series targets formal and informal educators that are engaging students (elementary through college) in formal classroom settings, as well as members of the community in informal educational venues (e.g. after school programs, science centers, aquariums, etc.).

 

Check them out here: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html 

Proceedings of 2018 BoFEP Science Workshop Available

The Proceedings of the 12th Bay of Fundy Science Workshop  (2018) “A Changing Fundy Environment: Emerging Issues, Challenges and Priorities”, Editors: Joshua McNeely, Marianne Janowicz, Blythe Chang, Sarah Chamberlain, Susan J. Rolston, and Peter G. Wellsheld 9-12 May 2018 at the Agricultural Campus, Dalhousie University, Truro, NS, is now available on the BoFEP website.
The 12th workshop was attended by approximately 115 people, mostly from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. It was very encouraging to see so many young people in various positions attend and engage in the discussions. BoFEP was delighted to award Rachel Cadman and Jaya Fahey with the Best Student Poster and Paper presentation respectively. The plenary and public talks were on the North Atlantic Right whale, marine debris and the Bay of Fundy’s future. Paper sessions covered tidal energy, fisheries ecology and management, monitoring and contaminants, integrated coastal management, dykelands and tidal restoration, the new oceans protection plan, and marine protected areas. Three panels were held – ocean literacy and awareness, information use at the science‐policy interface, and future research needs and BoFEP’s continued role as an NGO. An excellent field trip took place, with tidal bore rafting on the nearby Shubenacadie River estuary.

2018 ACORN Conference – Building Bridges: Creating New Relationships in Agriculture

Are you passionate about organic and sustainable agriculture?

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The ACORN Conference a great opportunity for you to deepen your organic farming knowledge and network with people with similar interests. The conference is a three-day event that brings together farmers, researchers, processors, and businesses from across the region and beyond!

 

This year, you will have the opportunity to learn about sustainable livestock management, soil health, farming in changing climate, on-farm water security, seed to seed farming, and more!

 

Register before November 14 here: 2018acornconference.eventbrite.ca

 

We look forward to seeing you November 26-28, 2018 in Charlottetown, PEI.

Book Launch: There’s Something in the Water

The North Shore Chapter of the Council of Canadians, Fernwood Publishing and the Tatamagouche Centre invite you to join us for the launch of a timely new book entitled There’s Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous and Black Communities by Dr. Ingrid Waldron.

Event details
When:
 Tuesday, August 21 at 6:30 p.m.
Where: Tatamagouche Centre, 259 Loop Route 6, RR#3, Tatamagouche (Map).

Everyone is welcome is to this free event. Books will be available for sale on site.

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Speakers

  • Dr. Ingrid Waldron is Director of the Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities and Community Health Project (The ENRICH Project).
  • Dorene Bernard is a Mi’kmaq grassroots Grandmother, residential school survivor and water protector from Indian Brook, Nova Scotia. She is also a Board member of the Council of Canadians.
  • Louise Delisle is the founder and president of the Black Pioneers Acting Troupe and is from Shelburne, Nova Scotia.

This event is part of the Earth Activist Training Permaculture Design Certificate course, which is being offered at the Tatamagouche Centre from August 18 to September 1, 2018.

It is co-sponsored by North Shore Council of Canadians, Fernwood Publishing and Tatamagouche Centre.

For more information, please contact the Tatmagouche Centre at 902-657-2231 or info@tatacentre.ca

We hope to see you on August 21 – please bring a friend!