Let’s Talk Tidal April 1st 2019: Meet the Panel

The tidal talk is coming up fast – so its time to introduce you to the folks who will be sharing their thoughts at the Halifax Central Library at 6pm on April 1st

Chris White, NSEN Chair, Panel Moderator 
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Chris White is a mechanical engineer and first-year PhD student with the Renewable Energy Storage Laboratory at Dalhousie University, where he completed a Bachelor of Engineering in 2013 and a Master of Applied Science in 2015.
His early experiences working with renewable energy as an undergraduate student led him to six years of research in energy storage systems both as a graduate student and as an entrepreneur, featuring an internship at Tesla Motors in the USA, and a start-up venture as co-founder of Charged Engineering Inc.
For his PhD, Chris is now developing low-cost technologies to store renewable energy on the electricity grids and help speed up the transition away from fossil fuels. Outside his studies, Chris volunteers as Chair of the Nova Scotia Environmental Network, member of Solidarity Halifax, and facilitator of the KAIROS Blanket Exercise.
John Woods, VP Energy Development with Minas Energy 
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John Woods is a high energy, dynamic, entrepreneurial engineer, leader and manager and the current Vice President of Energy Development with Minas Energy, located in Hantsport, Nova Scotia.  Mr. Woods’ has 35 years of diversified employment experience in various private, Crown and public sector organizations. During the past decade, John has been a leader in the restructuring of the electricity industry in Nova Scotia and a Maritime Canada opinion setter; especially in helping the public understand issues around electricity supply and distribution.
Melissa Nevin, Director of Fisheries and Integrated Resources for the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nation Chiefs
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Melissa Nevin is the Director of Fisheries and Integrated Resources for the Atlantic Policy Congress of First Nation Chiefs.  She began her position as Director at the end of October 2018. Previously, Melissa worked as a Consultation Researcher for the  Kwilmu’kw Maw-klusuaqn Negotiation Office (KMKNO), and has also worked for the Unama’ki Institute of Natural Resources (UINR).
She graduated from Saint Mary’s University with a Bachelor of Arts in Geography in 2005, and is currently completing her MA in Geography.  Over the past 11 years, she has worked on Crown to Mi’kmaq consultation, and proponent and Mi’kmaq engagement on various projects in the natural resources sector, including: energy, mining, environment, fisheries, parks, etc.
Melissa is an advocate for Treaty and Aboriginal Rights and Title, and intends to work collaboratively to effectively change policies and processes in fisheries and environment for the betterment of Indigenous people in the Atlantic region.

 

 

Tony Wright, General Manager of FORCE

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Tony Wright is the General Manager of Fundy Ocean Research Center for Energy (FORCE) – Canada’s leading research centre for in-stream tidal energy. Situated in the Minas Passage on the Bay of Fundy, FORCE provides access to a shared Visitor/Operations Centre, submarine cables, grid connection, and environmental monitoring at its test site to tidal energy projects.

Prior to joining FORCE in May 2012, Tony had a 22-year career in the Royal Canadian Navy. As a naval engineering officer, he held a variety of leadership and technical roles onboard Canadian warships and ashore. Tony received his engineering degree from the Royal Military College of Canada and holds an MBA from Saint Mary’s University.

 

 

Graham Daborn, Professor, Acadia University 

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Graham Daborn is Professor Emeritus at Acadia University. He received his BA in English and Biology from the University of Keele (UK), and MSC and PhD degrees in Zoology from the University of Alberta. He was Professor of Biology at Acadia from 1973 to 2004, the Founding Director of the Acadia Centre for Estuarine Research (1984-2004), and Founding Director of the Arthur Irving Academy for the Environment (2004-2007).
As a biologist with interests in estuarine and freshwaters, Graham has (co-)written or (co-) edited 7 books, and more than 200 journal articles, technical reports, and information bulletins. Since 1976 his research has focused on estuaries, particularly the Bay of Fundy. Studies of the Bay of Fundy ecosystem have included: tides and tidal rhythms, sediment dynamics, fish and fisheries, plankton, benthic ecology and the general environmental effects of tidal power. He contributed material for the two Strategic Environmental Assessments of Marine Renewable Energy in the Bay of Fundy, for the FORCE Information Centre in Parrsboro, and for an assessment of Potential Marine Representative Areas in the Bay of Fundy for Parks Canada.
Daborn was Chair or Co-Chair of the Research Management Committee and theme leader for Policy and governance research for the Canadian Water Network (2001 – 2012) He has been a member of the Experts Committee on Marine Renewable Energy for the International Energy Agency, a volunteer member of the Environmental Monitoring Advisory Committee (EMAC) for the Fundy Ocean Research Centre (FORCE) since its establishment in 2009, and a member of the Research Advisory Committee for the Offshore Energy Research Association (OERA).
For his work with communities and public dissemination of scientific information about the Bay of Fundy, Daborn was awarded the Gulf of Maine Visionary Award in 1993 and the Outstanding Science Champion Award of the Discovery Centre in 2000.

 

Darren Porter, Fisher & Consultant  

Darren Porter is the founder and director of the Marine Institute of Nature and Academic Science (MINAS). Darren is an owner and operator of commercial licenses and has been fishing for his entire life. He started fishing clams, oysters, wild muscles, smelts, Gaspereau, eels, shad, herring, tomcod, flounder, mackerel, marine plant, squid, sculpin, and lobster. He has been very active in shellfish aquaculture, owning multiple shellfish leases in different maritime provinces including oysters, muscles, and scallops.

Darren has done consulting work for the provincial government as well as industry. He sits on the board of directors of four fishing associations, and he is a spokesman for the fishing industry and an advocate for small scale fisheries, coastal communities, and the environment. Darren also works extensively with universities and First Nations.

He has been involved with many studies, past and present, with Acadia University, Dalhousie University, DFO, the province of Nova Scotia, and the Mi’kmaq. His operations are open to the public, industry, academia, NGOs, and anybody that wishes to interact and immerse themselves in the local and traditional knowledge, and he provides a rare platform for people to see firsthand the diversity of marine life within the waters.

 

Sara Swinamer, Community Planner & Water Protector  

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Sara is the proud mother of two children. She is also a traditional Mi’kmaq and contemporary pow wow dancer and cultural educator. She teaches Dance 11 and instructs Mi’kmaq Studies 11 at Bridgetown High School for the Annapolis Valley Regional School Board.  She also enjoys working as a dance and physical education coach with the Muin Sipu preschool, elementary students, and after-school youth on the Bear River First Nation. Much of her work is dedicated to the rights of the children, to creatively allow children the freedom of expression and free thought forms through art, culture and education.  At age fourteen Sara flew to Ottawa, Canada as a Students Commission/National Capital Commission Youth Delegate at Carleton University. Her teaching within the school system to students and teachers alike helped to aspire other schools in Lunenburg County to also take action.

Sara has a Native Canadian Studies Certificate from Kjipuktuk Aboriginal College.  She has a continuing education certificate from Dalhousie University in the Urban & Rural Planning Studio. She has worked collaboratively with the Cities & Environment Unit, Dalhousie University, under the Direction of Frank Palermo to help write the First Nations Community Planning Model, which received:

2001 Dr. L. Gertler Award for Planning Excellence
This is the highest award in Canadian planning. Grand Prize by the Canadian Institute of Planners for the development of the First Nations Community Planning Model.

2002 2003 EDRA/Places & Planning Award
For Places by the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) out of Berkeley, California and the internationally circulated journal Places.

2004 Dubai International Best Practices Award to Improve the Living Environment
This award was won in conjunction with The First Nations Community Planning Project consists of community-based plans and capacity development in seventeen First Nations communities in Atlantic Canada. It was selected as one of 10 award winners from 680 submissions worldwide.

Sara was also recognized and awarded the 2005 Deputy Ministers Pride and Recognition Award. This award recognized excellence, professionalism, and dedication in achieving honours in the Indian Lands & Trusts Certification Program.

Sara has worked for the Confederacy Mainland Mi’kmaq as a specific land claims researcher. She has also worked at L’sitkuk Environment to promote climate change and species at risk education.  In 2016 Sara, who was volunteering for the Marine Animal Response Society, took the call for action to investigate a beached whale in Sandy Cove, Nova Scotia. During the weeks that followed the whale stranding’s a massive fish kill occurred on the shores of the St. Mary Bay and other parts of the Bay of Fundy.  As a response to gaps in Provincial and Federal response and reporting, Sara created the Bay of Fundy Water Protectors; a nonviolent social media action group whose mission is to protect, restore and preserve. She is a water protector, land defender, and human rights activist always on the lookout to advocate for peace, truth and justice.

 

Mike Wambolt, Fisheries Biologist  

Mike Wambolt is an environmental professional with more than 16 years of experience in government and private industry. He holds a B.Sc. with a major in Aquaculture from Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia.
Over the past 11 years, Mike has been working as a Fisheries Biologist for Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) assessing the impacts of projects in freshwater and marine environments. Mike is currently working as the Section Head for Marine Developments in the Fisheries and Oceans, Fisheries Protection Program in the Maritimes Region providing oversight to a wide variety of regulatory project reviews.

Mike has been the lead on a number of project reviews for DFO including offshore oil and gas and marine renewable energy development with a focus on In-Stream Tidal projects since 2013 along with playing a key role on numerous other departmental programs such as environmental emergency response and project-specific compliance monitoring.

 

Colin Sproul, Vice-President Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association 

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Colin Sproul is Vice-President at the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association.
He is a board director at the Clean Ocean Action Committee, Southwest Lobster Science Society and Wood’s Hole Oceanographic Institution Ropeless Consortium.
He is also a member of the Nova Scotia New Democratic Party’s Environment Committee.
Colin has spoken previously on tidal energy at Dalhousie University, The Canadian Centre for Ethics in Public Affairs and the Legislature’s Standing Committee on Natural Resources.

Colin helped lead his fishermen’s association through its protracted battle with Emera, Fundy Ocean Research Centre for Energy and Nova Scotia’s Department of Environment over tidal development in the Minas Passage.

His family has fished from Delap’s Cove in Annapolis County for 5 generations and he’s passionate about the people in his community carrying on their way of life.

 

Don’t miss it! Check out the Facebook event here: https://www.facebook.com/events/415627352344466

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Ministry of Energy and Mines Backtracks on No Plan to Cap Contaminating Drill Hole

John Perkins spokesperson for Sustainable Northern Nova Scotia says “SuNNS membership and Tatamagouche area residents are pleased to hear the Ministry of Energy and Mines is committed to capping a leaking exploration drill hole in the French River Watershed”.

Perkins notes “this is a big change in the Ministry of Energy and Mines
approach to this contaminating drill hole.” Frances Willick reported in a January 25 CBC article that Don James, Ministry of Energy and Mines, had stated “the responsibility for the hole now rests with the landowner”. “Mines and Energy’s reversal indicates the power of a Free Press, the effectiveness of local community advocacy groups like SuNNS and the power of municipal governments to bring pressure on the provincial government” says Perkins.
“The contaminating drill hole sits in the French River watershed, the sole source of water for the Village of Tatamagouche, so I think the Municipality of Colchester and area Councilor Michael Gregory were very upset when Mines and Energy failed to contact them regarding their plans to not address the polluting drill hole” says SuNNS member Paul Jenkinson.
“The discovery of one uncapped contaminating drill hole on Warwick Mountain and the possibility of more leaking drill holes has raised the spectre of 780 other unmonitored mining exploration drill holes across the province”, Perkins notes.
SuNNS is asking the Ministry of Energy and Mines to immediately instruct staff to visit all drill hole sites and return in 6 months with a report on their condition.
SuNNS is asking Minister Mombourquette to issue an order that any polluting drill holes be immediately capped by the Ministry of Energy and Mines, upon discovery of their “leaking” status.
SuNNS is asking Minister Mombourquette to remove new regulatory language that allows landowners to request wells remain uncapped.
SuNNS once again calls on the Ministry of Energy and Mines to abandon plans to issue a Request for Proposals for gold mining exploration or development in the French River Watershed and the six other watersheds in the current Enclosure Area.
SuNNS further supports the efforts of the Municipality of Colchester as it seeks “Protected“ status for the French River Watershed under the Environmental Act given that the French River is the sole source of water for the Village of Tatamagouche.

Let’s Talk Tidal Power: What’s Happening in the Bay of Fundy?

NSEN Tidal Event Photo.pngAs the world moves to replace fossil fuels with clean renewable energy, Nova Scotia finds itself with some of the world’s greatest tidal power resources in the iconic Bay of Fundy. After decades of research and pilot projects, however, some people are growing concerned that the present course of development will have negative consequences for the natural systems of the Bay and the livelihoods and cultures that are tied to it. So, what’s happening in the Bay of Fundy?

The Nova Scotia Environmental Network and the Halifax Central Library are proud to present this panel discussion to help the public understand who is who in the tidal energy sector, the history of development, where things stand today, what is at stake, and how the future could unfold. 

Moderated by Dr. Boris Worm of Dalhousie University, the panel will include tidal researchers, developers, regulators, First Nations, and fishers, bringing together a diverse set of perspectives for a balanced discussion and Q&A period.


Funding for this program is provided by the Atlantic Council for International Cooperation and Global Affairs Canada.

Click attending and share our Facebook event here!

Opportunity to input: Government and expert review of  Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Secretariat for Canada wishes to inform you that the Second Order Draft of the IPCC Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate is available for government and expert review until January 11, 2019, 19:00 EST.

The SROCC is highly relevant for Canada with its focus on high mountain areas; polar regions; sea level rise and implications for low-lying islands; coasts and communities; changing ocean, marine ecosystems and dependent communities; and extremes, abrupt changes and managing risks.

Review of the SROCC Second Order Draft by experts in Canada will help ensure that it provides a balanced and comprehensive assessment of the latest scientific findings and relevant, factual and scientific information for policy makers.

An online registration process is open for prospective expert reviewers via the SOD Review webpage. Registration will close on 4 January 2019, 19:00 ESTone week before the end of the review period.

The IPCC Secretariat for Canada values the contributions of Canada’s expert reviewers in this process and we thank-you in advance for your time and efforts. Opportunity to input: Government and expert review of

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Marine Sanctuary Webinar Series

The National Marine Sanctuary Webinar Series provides educators with educational and scientific expertise, resources and training to support ocean and climate literacy in the classroom. This series targets formal and informal educators that are engaging students (elementary through college) in formal classroom settings, as well as members of the community in informal educational venues (e.g. after school programs, science centers, aquariums, etc.).

 

Check them out here: https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/teachers/webinar-series-archives.html 

Proceedings of 2018 BoFEP Science Workshop Available

The Proceedings of the 12th Bay of Fundy Science Workshop  (2018) “A Changing Fundy Environment: Emerging Issues, Challenges and Priorities”, Editors: Joshua McNeely, Marianne Janowicz, Blythe Chang, Sarah Chamberlain, Susan J. Rolston, and Peter G. Wellsheld 9-12 May 2018 at the Agricultural Campus, Dalhousie University, Truro, NS, is now available on the BoFEP website.
The 12th workshop was attended by approximately 115 people, mostly from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. It was very encouraging to see so many young people in various positions attend and engage in the discussions. BoFEP was delighted to award Rachel Cadman and Jaya Fahey with the Best Student Poster and Paper presentation respectively. The plenary and public talks were on the North Atlantic Right whale, marine debris and the Bay of Fundy’s future. Paper sessions covered tidal energy, fisheries ecology and management, monitoring and contaminants, integrated coastal management, dykelands and tidal restoration, the new oceans protection plan, and marine protected areas. Three panels were held – ocean literacy and awareness, information use at the science‐policy interface, and future research needs and BoFEP’s continued role as an NGO. An excellent field trip took place, with tidal bore rafting on the nearby Shubenacadie River estuary.

2018 ACORN Conference – Building Bridges: Creating New Relationships in Agriculture

Are you passionate about organic and sustainable agriculture?

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The ACORN Conference a great opportunity for you to deepen your organic farming knowledge and network with people with similar interests. The conference is a three-day event that brings together farmers, researchers, processors, and businesses from across the region and beyond!

 

This year, you will have the opportunity to learn about sustainable livestock management, soil health, farming in changing climate, on-farm water security, seed to seed farming, and more!

 

Register before November 14 here: 2018acornconference.eventbrite.ca

 

We look forward to seeing you November 26-28, 2018 in Charlottetown, PEI.