NSEN and the Truro Public Library Launch New Talking Circle Series with Catherine Martin

The first of four traditional Mi’kmaq Learning Circles, entitled “Ego to Eco: Learning the Mi’kmaq calendar to Experience Human and Ecological Health’s Interdependence,” will be held at the Truro Public Library on November 7th from 6 to 8 p.m. in the Reading Room. Catherine Anne Martin will present thoughts on the Mi’kmaq teachings on the interdependence of environmental and human health as exemplified in the Mi’kmaw traditional calendar of thirteen moons that focuses on the natural events of our climate cycle and what other species are doing in each moon cycle.

This focus on the “other” helps humans to be more aware of the ecological needs of all species and how we are a part of those same needs.  Going from our own “ego wants” to “eco needs,” through exposure to indigenous cultural reality, is necessary to change our ways in the cause of the planet’s and our own health. Unmitigated destructive polluting and resource extraction practices, along with our own misplaced focus on egocentric “wants,” has led us to environmental degradation and climate instability. Such issues as wellness, motivation,     

Thanks to Catherine Martin’s gracious gift to lead the 2018 Halifax circles and partial funding from the Halifax Community Health Board of the Nova Scotia Health Authority, this new series has been extended to the Truro region through the co-sponsorship of the Truro Public Library and will continue each month (December 5, January 9 and February 5) at the same location. 

NSEN, with its revitalized new board chaired by Ph.D. Engineering student, Chris White, and the crucial in-kind support of one of Truro’s favourite gathering place has agreed to host Mi’kmaq circles in order to facilitate a more ecologically and inclusive way for people to meet and face our fragile future on the planet. The series looks at components of human health—fitness, wellbeing, motivation and direction through the prism of environmental elements and the eco-centric Mi’kmaq Calendar.

For millennia the unceded Mi’kmaw territory (what is now called the Atlantic Provinces) was sustained by an eco-centric philosophy of a land-based consciousness. The inclusivity and egalitarianism of this philosophy is exemplified by the Mi’kmaq talking circle tradition, an ideal setting for all people living in this time and space to come together to learn how to best survive spiritually, physically, mentally and emotionally. The circle format focuses on deep listening in a respectful way to the circle leader and then to each other as a sacred talking stick is passed, allowing each participant to share if he or she so wishes. 

By acknowledging that 1/ putting the needs for a healthy environment before egoic greed, 2/ considering what the fullness of the natural world (of which human animals are a part) offers in each month through the perspective of the Mi’kmaw calendar and 3/ discussing the challenges of  being healthy in a society that most often ignores that nature is in control, will integrate humans to see that we must put nature first and create the political will to protect our environment above everything.

NSEN encourages a repeat of the broad spectrum of last year’s circles’ representation during which Mi’kmaq, Anishnabe, Cree and Haida First Nations, Inuit people from fifteen countries, all ages, genders and economic backgrounds, long time residents of Halifax, new Canadians, professionals from the arts and sciences and persons of all abilities came together to listen to the Circle leader and then to each other. 

Alanis Obomsawin, a renowned Abenaki filmmaker, singer, artist and activist, relayed this pithy and poignant indigenous wisdom:  “When the last tree has been cut down, the last fish caught, the last river poisoned, only then will we realize that one cannot eat money.”

Media Contact: Joanne Light,  jonilight3@yahoo.ca, 902-429-1571


SCHEDULE AND CONTENT OF 2018 TRURO MI’KMAQ TALKING CIRCLES

 

Catherine Martin

Hosted by Catherine Martin

B.A., Theatre Arts (Dalhousie U.), M. Ed., Media Literacy (Mount Saint Vincent U.) and Member of the Order of Canada and of the Millbrook Mi’kmaw Community in Truro is an independent producer, director, writer, facilitator, communications consultant, drummer and the first woman Mi’kmaw filmmaker from the Atlantic Region.

Mi’kmaq teachings understand human and ecological health are interdependent. Ego to eco-centricity improves fitness, wellbeing, direction and motivation.

 

Schedule of Events 

Wed., November 7 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Martin introduces“Keptekewiku” (frost month) to explore humans, the elements—water, air, earth and fire—and other species’ relations at a time when we may fear more anxiety for the winter to come.

Wed., December 5 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Martin introduces “Kesikewiku” (winter month) to explore relations in the dark and cold time. If we have an unstable climate, how does that affect species in winter?

Wed., January 9 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Martin introduces “Penamujuiku” (frost fish runs’ month) to explore relations when climate change disrupts other species and our own patterns of survival?

Tues., February 5 6:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Martin introduces “Apuknajit” (snow blinding month) to explore relations when we are blinded by the enormity of environmental and climate health issues and don’t know which way to turn. How can a respect for and understanding of Mother Nature help us?

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Workshop: Developing a Fundraising Progam

Oyler Consulting Workshops

DEVELOPING A FUNDRAISING PROGRAM

COST:  $75 per person (for additional attendees from the same organization fees are reduced to $60)

CRA POLICY PRESENTATIONS

COST:  $35 per person per presentation, $60 for both presentations (for additional attendees from the same organization fees are reduced to $30 for one presentation, $50 for both)

DATES & LOCATIONS 

Berwick – Thursday, November 1, Berwick Town Hall, 236 Commerical Street
Bridgewater – Wednesday, November 7, Meeting Room, Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre, 135 North Park Street
Truro – Tuesday, November 13, Willows Room – 2nd Floor, Colchester East Hants Health Centre, 600 Abenaki Road

For more information or to register please contact: David Oyler: david@oylerconsulting.ca , (902) 476-4755

A chance to upcycle: Donate Your Old Keys!

Old keys can unlock something beautiful.

Adsum House For Women & Children needs your old, unwanted keys to help create their next fundraising campaign.

They are going to use them to create HOPE.

They can’t tell you exactly what that means right now – they want it to be a surprise – but they will say, it is going to be a beautiful work of art that will draw attention to the need for secure housing and support for homeless women. Your old keys can play a big part in raising awareness and inspiring donations.

You can drop them off or mail them to us by October 11 at:

Adsum House
Attn. Kathy McNab
2421 Brunswick St.
Halifax, NS, B3K 2Z4
Open 24 hrs. 

Or, if you put on a “Key Drive” and collect a large number of keys from co-workers, your school or your neighbourhood, we would be happy to pick them up.

For more information or to arrange a pick-up, please contact:

Kathy McNab – 902-422-3389 – kathy.mcnab@adsumforwomen.org

Public Consultation Sessions for Dollar Lake Provincial Park

Public Consultation Sessions for Dollar Lake Provincial Park

Come share your ideas for future planning of Dollar Lake Provincial Park

Monday, October 15th, 2018

2:00pm – 4:00pm and 6:00pm – 8:00pm

Brief Presentations Will Occur at 2:30pm and 6:30pm

Location: Elmsdale Fire and Emergency Services

720 Highway #2, Elmsdale, NS, B2S 1E9

For more information on how to get involved: https://novascotia.ca/natr/parks/management/

Contact: Parks, Outreach & Service Delivery Division

1-866-230-1586 or parkplanning@novascotia.ca

If you know someone who is interested in this Park but may not have been contacted, please request them to email parkplanning@novascotia.ca to be added to the list and/or pass the information of the session on to them.

Sign the 2030 Declaration for Climate Justice in Nova Scotia

The Imagine 2030 Network has been working among a wide array of environmental organizations, grassroots groups, labour organizations, Mi’kmaq people, and businesses on a Declaration for climate action, climate justice and the green economy here in Nova Scotia. The immediate goal of the campaign is to convince the Nova Scotia government to hold public consultations and to update the Environmental Goals and Sustainable Prosperity Act (EGSPA) to include ambitious climate justice targets.

The primary proposed climate target is a 50% reduction in provincial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions below 1990 levels by 2030. If the province were to adopt this target and make it legally binding, many problematic fossil fuel developments being proposed in NS at present and in the future would be impossible to approve. The key, however, is to ensure these critical changes to our society go hand-in-hand with a just transition for workers and communities.

This Declaration has come from months of conversations within the network and beyond, and the advocated GHG target and jobs information is partly based on the Green Economy Network’s Climate Jobs Plan for Nova Scotia. While the Declaration is intentionally short and sweet, any organizations who sign on are encouraged to send a brief quote to be attached to the Declaration, highlighting why they signed on, why they think it is worthwhile, or just to add their own unique perspectives on climate justice.

The Declaration is provided below. If your organization will sign on to the Declaration, please forward your intent to Stephen Thomas, Energy Campaign Coordinator at EAC (stephen@ecologyaction.ca). If you would like to know more about the campaign before signing on, please get in touch with Stephen.

The launch event for the 2030 Declaration is at 10 AM on Thursday, August 30th at Hope Blooms in Halifax. Everyone is encouraged to attend!