NOW HIRING: Summer Positions: WIld Child NS Educator (2 Positions)

We are looking for some people who are magical with children to help deliver Wild Child Forest School Programming for the summer in the Kearney Lake area of Bedford for our 2019 Summer Season. Our ideal candidate would love being outside in all weathers, enjoy playing & supervising children, with an eye for safety and risk management.

About Sierra Club Canada Foundation

Sierra Club Canada Foundation empowers people to protect, restore and enjoy a healthy and safe planet. SCCF’s objective is to protect and restore the health of the natural environment, including communities, by empowering Sierra Club members and its citizens through education and action.

Sierra Club Canada Foundation is committed to creating a diverse work environment and is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

Wild Child Forest School is a project of Sierra Club Canada Foundation that provides child-led, play-based learning through repeated exposure to nature. At forest school we empower children to take the lead on their learning in a natural setting over time, which may mean getting wet, dirty, making stuff with tools, and learn to extend their limits in a thoughtful and intentional way. Our program takes place entirely outside, so the ideal candidate would be comfortable in an outdoor setting for 8 hours a day.

To find out more about our programs visit wildchildatlantic.ca

Tasks and Responsibilities

As part of the staffing team, you will:

  • Contribute to the development & delivery Wild Child Forest School programming with the Wild Child NS leaders.
  • Lead songs, tell stories, inspire enthusiasm, share knowledge, and create a positive atmosphere for children in a natural setting
  • Support the development of a child’s ability to navigate risks
  • Mediate conflicts between participants maintaining dignity and respect for everyone involved
  • Ensure proper protocols and Safe Work Practices are enacted
  • Foster curiosity and excitement about nature
  • Maintain session notes and contributions to social media platforms

Qualifications

This position is a Canada Summer Job position and candidates must:

  • be between 15 and 30 years of age at the start of the employment;
  • be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, or person to whom refugee protection has been conferred under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act for the duration of the employment*; and,
  • have a valid Social Insurance Number at the start of employment and be legally entitled to work in Canada in accordance with relevant provincial or territorial legislation and regulations.

The program’s broader objectives as part of the Youth Employment Strategy are to improve the labour market participation of Canadian youth.

*International students are not eligible participants. International students include anyone who is temporarily in Canada for studies and who is not a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, or person who has been granted refugee status in Canada.

As an educator, we would like for you to have:

  • Some post-secondary training in a relevant area (Early Childhood Education, Science (Ecology, Biology, etc.) , Psychology, Education, etc.) or sufficient qualifying experience
  • Be an excellent communicator and team player with attention for details
  • Have previous experience working with children
  • Love nature and being outside in it (this include bugs, getting dirty, & playing in the rain)
  • Have a positive fun attitude, yet professional approach

Applicants must also be prepared to provide a clean Criminal Records Check with Vulnerable Sector Screen and a clear Child Abuse Registry Search.

Valid First Aid with AED/CPR-C or Wilderness First Aid would be considered an asset.

Valid Driver’s License and access to a reliable car would also be considered an asset.

Dates and Times of Work

This position will be 10 weeks in length with potential for part-time/casual work in the Fall. This position starts Monday, June 24th to Friday, August 30st,

Hours of work are Monday to Friday from 8:30am to 4:30pm, with 2 holidays Mondays off during the summer.

Remuneration: $13/hr, 40hours/week for 10 weeks

Deadline: Midnight on Sunday, June 9th, If you think you are the ideal candidate, please apply early.

To apply, please submit a resume and cover letter outlining your education, experience, and interest as a single email attachment to Gretchen Fitzgerald, National Programs Director at gretchenf@sierraclub.ca. Please include “Wild Child NS Summer Student Application” in the subject line of the email.

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Stay Safe in the Season of Love – Watch for Wildlife urges drivers to be extra cautious during deer & moose mating season.

FREDERICTON, NB [Oct 2nd, 2018]— Watch for Wildlife is asking drivers to take extra care to avoid collisions with wildlife over the Thanksgiving long weekend and into the weeks that follow.

“It’s that time of year again,” says Kristin Elton, Watch for Wildlife’s Outreach Coordinator for New Brunswick. “The annual fall rut for deer and moose is upon us, so these animals are on the move looking for mates. As a result, they are crossing more roads as they move through the landscape on their search.”

These animals are most active at dawn and dusk and with decreasing daylight hours, more drivers are on the roads at this time. This, combined with the change in animal behaviour, results in a spike in deer and moose collisions at this time of year.

Mating season also causes deer and moose to be bolder so they may be less apprehensive of roads and people. The onset of hunting season and colder weather also means deer, moose and other wildlife are moving from place to place and may run and bolt suddenly.  

WildLife Fall Sierra Club.pngThe Watch for Wildlife program urges drivers to be extra aware driving over the next month and to keep in mind tips for preventing collisions including:

  • paying extra attention at the wheel and obeying the speed limit, especially in areas where you aren’t familiar with the road
  • scanning ahead and looking for movement or shining eyes on the sides of the road
  • slowing down when you see an animal if it is safe to do so as even a slight reduction in speed can give animals enough time to get out of the way safely and
  • if a collision is inevitable, the best thing to do is ‘steer for the rear’ of the deer or moose, as this is less likely to cause as much damage as hitting the animal straight on.

Beyond the increased risk of interactions on the roads, it is also important to give these animals extra space if you encounter them on your property or out on the trails, in order to avoid human-wildlife conflicts in general.

For further tips on preventing wildlife-vehicle collisions, you can visit Watch for Wildlife’s website at www.watchforwildlife.ca for more information.

Sierra Club Applauds Neonicotinoid Pesticide Phase-Out, Calls for Fast Action to Protect Bees

OTTAWA, ON, August 15, 2018 – Sierra Club welcomes the ban of dangerous neonicotinoid pesticides, announced today by Health Canada, and urges a more rapid phase-out than the proposed three-year timeline. Health Canada announced today it was phasing out two of the more commonly used neonicotinoid pesticides.
Neonicotinoids contain neurotoxins that affect insect life. Concerns about impacts on pollinators, especially bees, has mobilized Canadians to stop the use of these chemicals.
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Last year, the international body devoted to protecting global biodiversity, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) released a review of over 1,100 peer-reviewed scientific studies, concluding there is no doubt neonicotinoids harm bees.

Health Canada’s own research found that impacts on aquatic insects, often vital to food webs – including fish and birds – are threatened by harmful levels of at least one of these chemicals found in the environment. And because insects are the most diverse known form of life on the planet, impacts on insects should raise alarm for global biodiversity.

“The scientific evidence that these pesticides were hurting pollinators and aquatic life is overwhelming and alarming,” according to Sierra Club Canada Foundation National Program Director Gretchen Fitzgerald. This evidence is being taken seriously by Health Canada, and we applaud them for taking action. We are breathing a sigh of relief today, but hope Health Canada will move quickly to make sure use is stopped sooner than their 2021 deadline.”
“For years, our supporters have pushed for the rapid ban of these pesticides,” according to Fitzgerald. “I can only hope that the damage we have already seen caused by neonics – and the resulting massive public concern – will result in reform for how we approve such pesticides in the first place.”