Stay Safe in the Season of Love – Watch for Wildlife urges drivers to be extra cautious during deer & moose mating season.

FREDERICTON, NB [Oct 2nd, 2018]— Watch for Wildlife is asking drivers to take extra care to avoid collisions with wildlife over the Thanksgiving long weekend and into the weeks that follow.

“It’s that time of year again,” says Kristin Elton, Watch for Wildlife’s Outreach Coordinator for New Brunswick. “The annual fall rut for deer and moose is upon us, so these animals are on the move looking for mates. As a result, they are crossing more roads as they move through the landscape on their search.”

These animals are most active at dawn and dusk and with decreasing daylight hours, more drivers are on the roads at this time. This, combined with the change in animal behaviour, results in a spike in deer and moose collisions at this time of year.

Mating season also causes deer and moose to be bolder so they may be less apprehensive of roads and people. The onset of hunting season and colder weather also means deer, moose and other wildlife are moving from place to place and may run and bolt suddenly.  

WildLife Fall Sierra Club.pngThe Watch for Wildlife program urges drivers to be extra aware driving over the next month and to keep in mind tips for preventing collisions including:

  • paying extra attention at the wheel and obeying the speed limit, especially in areas where you aren’t familiar with the road
  • scanning ahead and looking for movement or shining eyes on the sides of the road
  • slowing down when you see an animal if it is safe to do so as even a slight reduction in speed can give animals enough time to get out of the way safely and
  • if a collision is inevitable, the best thing to do is ‘steer for the rear’ of the deer or moose, as this is less likely to cause as much damage as hitting the animal straight on.

Beyond the increased risk of interactions on the roads, it is also important to give these animals extra space if you encounter them on your property or out on the trails, in order to avoid human-wildlife conflicts in general.

For further tips on preventing wildlife-vehicle collisions, you can visit Watch for Wildlife’s website at www.watchforwildlife.ca for more information.

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Sierra Club Applauds Neonicotinoid Pesticide Phase-Out, Calls for Fast Action to Protect Bees

OTTAWA, ON, August 15, 2018 – Sierra Club welcomes the ban of dangerous neonicotinoid pesticides, announced today by Health Canada, and urges a more rapid phase-out than the proposed three-year timeline. Health Canada announced today it was phasing out two of the more commonly used neonicotinoid pesticides.
Neonicotinoids contain neurotoxins that affect insect life. Concerns about impacts on pollinators, especially bees, has mobilized Canadians to stop the use of these chemicals.
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Last year, the international body devoted to protecting global biodiversity, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) released a review of over 1,100 peer-reviewed scientific studies, concluding there is no doubt neonicotinoids harm bees.

Health Canada’s own research found that impacts on aquatic insects, often vital to food webs – including fish and birds – are threatened by harmful levels of at least one of these chemicals found in the environment. And because insects are the most diverse known form of life on the planet, impacts on insects should raise alarm for global biodiversity.

“The scientific evidence that these pesticides were hurting pollinators and aquatic life is overwhelming and alarming,” according to Sierra Club Canada Foundation National Program Director Gretchen Fitzgerald. This evidence is being taken seriously by Health Canada, and we applaud them for taking action. We are breathing a sigh of relief today, but hope Health Canada will move quickly to make sure use is stopped sooner than their 2021 deadline.”
“For years, our supporters have pushed for the rapid ban of these pesticides,” according to Fitzgerald. “I can only hope that the damage we have already seen caused by neonics – and the resulting massive public concern – will result in reform for how we approve such pesticides in the first place.”